686 v. 629 pricing?

Forums General Discussion 686 v. 629 pricing?

  • This topic has 11 replies, 4 voices, and was last updated 8 years, 7 months ago by ed. This post has been viewed 2706 times
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  • #299330
    jv nc
    Participant

    Ed:

    I know I’m wearing you out on these revolver Q’s. But, I promise I’m going to buy one….lol.

    What’s the diff. in pricing of the 629. I’m clear on the 686 price. Just need the upcharge amount for the .44.

    Thanks. Looking forward to the XDS I ordered coming in.

    jeff

    #306185
    ed
    Moderator

    I have many 686 models from $649.95 -$ $729.95

    I have a like new 44 mag 8 ich bbl gun $669.95

    $789 new above in 6 inch

    #306188
    jv nc
    Participant

    Thanks Ed. On the 686’s….what does the -2; -3; etc… designation stand for? Example – 686-3.

    #306189
    todd
    Participant

    The dash reflects engineering changes.

    The 686 was introduced in the 1980 as the S&W Model 686 Distinguished Combat Magnum Stainless. It featured flash-chromed, forged hammer and trigger, and had a 6-shot cylinder.

    -1 (1986): radius stud package, introduction of the floating hand.

    The “M” recall (1987) for the no-dash and -1 guns was to fit a new hammer nose and firing pin bushing to deal with certain brands of ammo causing (potentially fatal) binding when fired.

    -2 (1987) incorporated the “M” recall features as standard production.

    -3 (1988) floating hand deleted, new yoke retention system

    -4 (1993, apparently the most desirable) included a drilled-and-tapped frame, the introduction of the “+” model with 7 shots, flash-chromed hammer/trigger deleted (case-hardened only), new extractor, start shipping with round-butt frame only (no square-butt)

    -5 (1997) change to MIM hammer and trigger and frame-mounted firing pin, as well as the frame lug being machined as part of the frame (prior to this it was a separate part, fitted to and pressed into the frame).

    -6 (2001, current production) has The Lock

    -7 (2002, Performance Center) chambers .38 Super instead of .357 Magnum

    #306190
    ed
    Moderator

    It s great to have smart customers

    many S&W have had lots of design changes..

    Ed

    #306235
    jv nc
    Participant

    ED:

    JUST read that S&W has re-introduced the 586. Any ideas on price and avail. for a 6″ model?

    *Edit -Just called S&W Ed. 2-3mos. if I order one from you. Just don’t know the price.

    Thanks.

    #306238
    ed
    Moderator

    $659.95 WHEN THEY RELEASE..

    #306248
    bucknbass
    Participant

    Todd. Thanks for the info on design changes for this revolver. Maybe you can answer one more. I have a 586 from around the ’87 time frame. I just learned of the “modification’ you mentioned, so I have not had mine done. However, when I look on the side of the frame with the cylinder open what I see is M 586-1 (all on the same line with no difference in font and no parentheses). I’m guessing in my case the M refers to “Model” and not “Modified”. I’m I getting this right?

    #306249
    ed
    Moderator

    This was after the recall and never needed to go back..

    Ed

    #306250
    todd
    Participant

    I found more info on it:

    “SMITH & WESSON

    MODEL 581, 586, 681, 686, or 581-1,

    586-1, 681-1, 686-1 & 686CS-1, REVOLVERS

    RECALL: Reports have been received from the field where the combination of a SMITH & WESSON L-FRAME 357 MAGNUM REVOLVER and some .357 Magnum ammunition has resulted in unacceptable cylinder binding. L-frame revolvers bearing model numbers:

    581, 586, 681, 686, or 581-1, 586-1,

    681-1, 686-1, 686CS-1

    Cylinder binding can cause a failure to fire. Mishandling a revolver while freeing the cylinder can result in accidental discharge.

    Cylinder binding can result from a number of causes, including characteristics of an individual revolver or the use of ammunition, which does not conform to industry pressure specifications or is particularly fast burning. Recent developments in ammunition manufacture emphasize the production of .357 Magnum ammunition with increased velocity and greater primer sensitivity.

    Although there have been very few reported incidents of cylinder binding, in view of our concern for our customer’s safety and the reliability of Smith & Wesson products in all circumstances, we issue the following warning:

    In a situation where a failure to fire can be critical – such as law enforcement or personal protection – do not use .357 Magnum ammunition with an L-frame revolver bearing model numbers 581, 586, 681, 686 or 581-1, 586-1, 681-1, 686-1, 686CS-1 without an “M” over the model number until you have had the revolver modified.

    Those who need to use their L-frame revolver under these conditions prior to modification can safely fire .38 Special caliber ammunition.

    Smith & Wesson has developed a modification to improve existing L-frame revolvers. This improvement enables them to fire all .357 Magnum ammunition, without cylinder binding. Shipments of L-frame revolvers from our factory after August 21, 1987 already include this improvement.

    You can check if your revolver includes this improvement by looking at the left side of the frame when the cylinder is fully open. If your revolver has been stamped either with a “2” or higher number after the basic three-digit model number or with an “M” above the model number, your revolver includes this improvement and does not need modification. If your revolver bears the model number 581, 586, 681, 686, or 581-1, 586-1, 681-1, 686-1, 686CS-1 without an “M” over the model number, it does not include this improvement and your should have your revolver modified.

    Smith & Wesson will modify your L-frame revolver free of charge to eliminate the possibility of cylinder binding with .357 Magnum ammunition. Law enforcement agencies wishing to arrange for modification of L-frame revolvers should call 800-458-8469 between 9 A.M. and 6 P.M. Eastern time (MA residents call 413-734-8244). Other users should send their revolvers to a Smith & Wesson Warranty Service Center, specifying “L-frame improvement program” and enclosing their name and return address.

    One of the modifications to improve the L-frame revolver is the installation of a new hammer nose. This obsoletes all old L-frame hammer noses (part numbers 4702 and 7513) and all old L-frame hammer assemblies (part numbers 3366, 3378, 3380, 3382, 3391, 4722, 4723, 4726 and 472 in field parts inventories. Superseded parts should never be fitted into a modified revolver as this may result in malfunction. It is essential for safety that you return these obsolete L-frame hammer noses and obsolete L-frame hammer assemblies for a free exchange to:

    Smith & Wesson

    Service Department

    2100 Roosevelt Avenue

    Springfield, MA 01101

    Do not return L-frame hammer-nose bushings from your spare parts inventory inasmuch as they are useable in J, N and K-frame revolvers, which are not included in this Product Warning.

    We regret any inconvenience this may cause. Smith & Wesson’s first concern is the safety of its products and the protection of its customers.

    Source:

    Shotgun News November 1, 1989; page ?

    Guns & Ammo, December 1987; page 6″

    #306252
    jv nc
    Participant

    Hey Ed:

    One more question on the L frame .357’s and I’ll leave you alone.

    I just saw a 386 XL in the S&W catalog. Can you give me a price and avail. for this model?

    Thanks.

    I WILL CHECK IN AM REALLY BUSY AFTERNOON LOTS IN .. *****************

    I DID NOT GET A CHANCE TO LOOK AT QUESTION UNTIL I GOT HOME. ************

    ED

    #306263
    ed
    Moderator

    386 $719.95 164298 model

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